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    Bohemia in the 19th century

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    dleet86
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    Bohemia in the 19th century

    Post by dleet86 on Mon Jan 02, 2017 5:58 am

    Bohemian map with a lot of territories.

    Burgess was in the west coast movement to counter the decadent European literary movement but got into trouble with the temperance movement

    In the 1850s, aesthetic bohemians began to arrive in the United States.[8] In New York City in 1857, a group of some 15–20 young, cultured journalists flourished as self-described "bohemians" until the American Civil War began in 1861.[9] This group gathered at a German bar on Broadway called Pffaff's beer cellar.[10] Members included their leader Henry Clapp, Jr., Walt Whitman, Fitz Hugh Ludlow, and actress Adah Isaacs Menken.[10]
    Similar groups in other cities were broken up as well by the Civil War and reporters spread out to report on the conflict. During the war, correspondents began to assume the title "bohemian", and newspapermen in general took up the moniker. Bohemian became synonymous with newspaper writer.[9] In 1866, war correspondent Junius Henri Browne, who wrote for the New York Tribune and Harper's Magazine, described "Bohemian" journalists such as he was, as well as the few carefree women and lighthearted men he encountered during the war years.[11]
    San Francisco journalist Bret Harte first wrote as "The Bohemian" in The Golden Era in 1861, with this persona taking part in many satirical doings, the lot published in his book Bohemian Papers in 1867. Harte wrote, "Bohemia has never been located geographically, but any clear day when the sun is going down, if you mount Telegraph Hill, you shall see its pleasant valleys and cloud-capped hills glittering in the West..."[12]
    Mark Twain included himself and Charles Warren Stoddard in the bohemian category in 1867.[9] By 1872, when a group of journalists and artists who gathered regularly for cultural pursuits in San Francisco were casting about for a name, the term bohemian became the main choice, and the Bohemian Club was born.[13] Club members who were established and successful, pillars of their community, respectable family men, redefined their own form of bohemianism to include people like them who were bons vivants, sportsmen, and appreciators of the fine arts.[12] Club member and poet George Sterling responded to this redefinition:
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    Re: Bohemia in the 19th century

    Post by Ren's View on Mon Jan 02, 2017 3:29 pm

    Are you trying to make a joke or did you confuse bohemian for David Bohm?
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    Re: Bohemia in the 19th century

    Post by dleet86 on Sat Jan 07, 2017 12:28 pm

    No, I'm just reviewing historically marginalized groups and their beliefs to see if I agree any of them or their thoughts. A lot of wisdom in a reservoir of dysfunctional vessels from families, schools, states, and cities. I had to have an espresso in the Austrian cafe where Trotsky hung out, still there. Artistically grounded communities (even if it's only from 17st to Broderick, and west to the bridges) have a unique flavor, but I'm too old to explore again.
    However, https://www.facebook.com/mymodernmet/?pnref=story is a great source of artistry's exploration. Another state not included in the map is Blasphemiapolis, a city laid out in rings like DC, Paris, and Sydney. https://www.thevenusproject.com/resource-based-economy/environment/circular-city/ Ironically the green planning for the future is called Venus, the closest planet smothered in noxious gases and temperatures too high for any life forms.
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    Re: Bohemia in the 19th century

    Post by Ren's View on Sat Jan 07, 2017 2:09 pm

    In my last two years in the Navy I was on a ship whose home port was the Naval Station at Alameda, SF Bay.  When we were back in the states, about 1/3 of those two years, I explored most of the East Bay, as well as San Francisco on foot and with some help from the busses.  They were still building BART back then, so no BART, just busses.

    I discovered the City Lights Bookstore in the summer of '68, and I made many trips back there over the next two years.  I'd begun my research into the concept of freedom just before I came home in '70, and I'd started right there at City Lights.  It was there that I found my first links to Chomsky that led me to his lecture given January 8-9, 1970, at the University of Chicago, Language and Freedom.


    Noam Chomsky wrote:
    When I was invited to speak on the topic “Language and freedom”, I was puzzled and intrigued. Most of my professional life has been devoted to the study of language. There would be no great difficulty in finding a topic to discuss in that domain. And there is much to say about the problems of freedom and liberation as they pose themselves to us and to others in the mid-twentieth century. What is troublesome in the title of this lecture is the conjunction. In what way are language and freedom to be interconnected?

    As a preliminary, let me say just a word about the contemporary study of language, as I see it. There are many aspects of language and language use that raise intriguing questions, but – in my judgement – only a few have so far led to productive theoretical work. In particular, our deepest insights are in the area of formal grammatical structure. A person who knows a language has acquired a system of rules and principles – a “generative grammar,” in technical terms – that associates sound and meaning in some specific fashion. There are many reasonably well-founded and, I think, rather enlightening hypotheses as to the character of such grammars, for quite a number of languages. Furthermore, there has been a renewal of interest in “universal grammar”, interpreted now as the theory that tries to specify the general properties of those languages that can be learned in the normal way by humans. Here, too, significant progress has been achieved.

    I confess. I had no idea what he was talking about.  But I was determined to find out.

    Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti Tells Robert Scheer: I Am Not a Beat! 

    Lawrence Ferlinghetti wrote:
    Despite his lifetime of work with the Beats, Ferlinghetti never considered himself one. “I was a straight man keeping the store back home,” he says cheerfully. “I was leading a respectful married life on Portrero Hill. These guys were much too far out for me. I didn’t go out on the road with them. And I came from a former generation. When I arrived in San Francisco I was still wearing my beret from Paris, and we were known as bohemians ... people who led an unconventional creative life before the Beats came along.”

    When I was just a farm kid, an estranged oddball wandering around the university coffee houses off the UofM campus in Ann Arbor, but drawn like a moth to a light to them whenever I had a chance to get off the farm, it was those Beats -- with their exotic indifference to the staid academics that seemed to be shunning me through their children in the halls of Ann Arbor High -- that called to me as the sort of mysterious, existentialist anarchists I'd been reading about through people like Albert Camus.  

    So eventually I get City Lights Bookstore drawing the moth in me from the darkness to flutter about the bright lights bound in book covers on its shelves.  It just seems so natural, looking back, like it was scripted or something.


    Last edited by Ren's View on Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Re: Bohemia in the 19th century

    Post by dleet86 on Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:24 am

    I used to go to SFO regularly and I picked up a Parabola Magazine at City Lights Bookstore and another book, a used one I think. Aunt Maudie's in Denver was a coffee shop, bookstore, and hippie hangout. You could climb on ladders to get some books and from the heights of the bookshelves, a loft with sofas and easy chairs was one step away. All of this Eden was to be had at midnight no less, if not 24/7.

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