An extension of Watching Apocalypse


    Art As Therapy

    Share
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Sep 22, 2016 5:34 am

    First topic message reminder :

    Alain De Botton on Art as Therapy:


    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Tue May 16, 2017 7:50 am

    Beautiful, intimate moment with nature for someone to record, and so wondrously.

    What little time I've lived in cities (ten years in West Oakland pretty much sums it up), I never got to see anything like that while walking the city streets.  I did see cool things up in the hills above Berkeley and Oakland which remain open, public access park lands, safe from development, I don't know how.  Developers must slobber with anticipation when a crude creature like Trump gets into the White House.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Sun May 21, 2017 8:31 am

    I haven't been back west for nigh on more than 30 years ago now. Even then the area I was visiting (the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley) had changed quite a lot, didn't do a lot of exploring past there. While growing up though when I was living with my father I used to wander around and once in awhile do some camping in the Niles Canyon area. Sometimes now I wonder why my dad would even let me go off, never got to meet one but those days they still had pumas roaming around them dar hills.
     Much earlier in childhood when my dear mother (i hope she rots in hell) housed me and the sap she was hooking up with was trying to keep her away from the bright lights I was living about two miles outside of Big Basin State Park in the Santa Cruz Mountains. That was a cool place, the town of Boulder Creek was maybe 3 or four miles down the road but one could cut that down if you took some short cuts through the woods. But at any rate there was not that much in town to interest a young lad any ways, sometimes it was just a different thing to do and maybe catch a steel head caught in the shallows of a stream that had run low of water along the way. At that time the town had total of maybe 103 souls officially, they had one gas station, one hardware store, one grocery store and one motel that was also the town watering hole, throw in a four room school house and that was the town. Yep, that was it! 
     Loved that place and time, wish I'd never gone back so I could just remember it as it was. Before I shipped out I got in my little MG ( TD ) and made the trip to visit for the first time in about 8 or 10 years.......in the few short years I'd been away the place had changed drastically. What had been just a narrow two lane road had widened to a very generous two lanes to accommodate an occasional three lanes. Outside of the state park Redwood trees were being clear cut to make room for golf courses and housing developments. I talked to some people on my through and they said the winter pop. was 'only' about 2,500 but in the summer months ballooned to about 15,000 or more, they wasn't sure.

    Wish I'd never gone back.

    Time for some therapy.


    edited as there has been something nagging at me since I posted so now after rereading it later today sure enough I had to amend a couple of things like removing some extra zeros and identifying Big Basin as a state park rather than a national treasure (though I think it should be national, but forget that with the dumpster fire burning)
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Mon May 22, 2017 7:55 am

    Loved those little MGTDs.

    I'm guessing, from some thing you've said, you are living somewhere in the Midwest, one of those states that got hit by the ice storms this winter.  Missouri perhaps.

    I haven't spent much time in Southern California.  Been there a few times.  I guess the air has improved some since I first saw it, with all the rainbow colored hews as you drop down into the valley coming in from the high desert.  Just too many people for me.

    I think the truth is you can't go back.  Not without a time machine.

    K. allen from Thom's (I believe DRC mixed you two up once; I was amused) sends me things in email from time to time.  She sent me this site the other day:

    How to Save the Planet According to the World’s Greatest Minds

    Asked me if I'd seen it.  Said my response is always welcome.

    I looked through the site, saw a lot of usual reactions to the situations.  One "solution" in particular struck me... that "oneness" mentality.


    I think my response fits this conversation somehow:

    I'm a big supporter of consciousness as a way to achieve the best possible relationship with the planet... for the individual.  Group consciousness at the level of 7 point some billion people, is another manner of consciousness, and that is a level I don't see being addressed by anyone, so far. What I'm seeing is that humanity is organized (think of that word as organ -- ized) into large machine-like institutional organisms.  These institutions are not human beings with empathic consciousnesses, but are, functionally, the basis for human survival (at least in the short term), rather than the basis for survival being the the highly empathic conscious individual acting on her or his own accord.  Those two ways of seeing consciousness do not seem to merge. Maybe they do somehow, but I can't see it.

    One of the notions I became aware of in my own efforts to achieve my individual consciousness, in this regard anyway, is that human beings are cultural beings at least as significantly as they are individuals.  If I want to talk about any notion of oneness, I must also consider that particular, individualized awareness I've come to.  It cannot be simply excluded.  One of the results of my awareness is I become rebellious of the grouped cultural forces everyone seems to have joined, even when they voice rebellious thoughts about them.  In actual terms, that puts me in an very small, extremely ineffectual position, sometimes with a few other outliers like myself.  A number of things will happen to the outliers of the normative institutional behaviors of any given society.  If they are disruptive enough to the institutions, forced institutionalization will be an applied effect. Institutions usually evolve instruments of enforcement for that.  This apparently seems to be at least one of the things that institutions have learned over the eons of institutional evolution.  If outliers and dissidents want their freedom from that imposed condition, they must be careful to exercise their dissent within certain allowed parameters.  That too is part of consciousness.

    When I hear calls for "saving" the planet, I also think we need to revisit the notion that we, as individuals, are in any way involved in "saving" something, at least without thinking seriously about saving it from what, exactly. Quite often what comes next after the call is a message to the individual to do something on the individual level to change.  One of the questions that's come up for me in this regard is: can an individual consciousness have any effect on the larger institutional organisms that people take part in as part of their survival?  This becomes of special concern to me when the epitome of that what is an icon for a very sizable group of individuals calling themselves the United States suddenly emerges from the tumultuous maelstrom, an iconic figure like Donald Trump.



    On the individual level, I'm getting by best I know how, given everything.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Thu May 25, 2017 5:23 am

    Any idea what happened with or to Drc? For some reason I thought the two of you lived in the same general area. I vaguely remember once the two of you suggesting ya'll meet for a bit of chin wagging.
    Mixing up me for Kay and vice versa was easy enough to do what with the very close same sign on names but I'm sure Kay took more offense to the mix ups than I ever did. I can't imagine anyone confusing my hard edged thoughts for Kay's no matter how much I would be flattered by their mistake.

    Missouri? Nah, I haven't been south of the Mason Dixon Line since about 73 or 4, and the last time I was down there I swore it'd be the last time I'd ever set foot and Missouri is too close for my comfort. So I never considered it. When I finally kissed off the family that never wanted me around anyways and accepted the fact I would always be alone I moved about as far away from the west coast as I could get otherwise I realized at all times some family thing would be in my way emotionally. The only reason I went back in the early eighties as to say goodbye to my grand parents while they were still in reasonable health and before they passed because they were the only ones that took it upon themselves to get me off the streets and to see me through high school. I'd stayed with them in that one place longer than I had ever been in one place before, so as far as roots go that three or four years with them means a lot to me. They offered me food and shelter I could always count on being there which was more than anyone else was willing to offer me and after rising six kids of their own I'm sure there were other things they'd envisioned for their semi-retirement then getting stuck with a wayward throw away who only knew alone and was at lest emotionally detached if not completely dysfunctional in that perspective. Yeah, rather a low bar for family I guess. But there are much worse stories out there and things haven't work out badly for me so no complaints on them from this distant space in time. Bless both of them.


    More a little later on, I'm trying to put a few thoughts together in my head in response to Kay's and your musings and I've run out of time at the moment.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu May 25, 2017 7:51 am

    Naw, I've wondered, and I've tried to pry it from the implacable wall that became the Hartmann institution.  Not even polycarp was allowed that information.  Apparently, though he and DRC were both something called moderators, they were not associates at any level.  Both shared a mutual incompetence with the board technology, and, after all, it is through the technology they shared their efforts to moderate, to any extent they moderated anything.  There was no back room where they met as actual human beings and talked. 

    DRC lived in Portland, about two and a half hours drive from here.  I once told him if he wanted to get together he would have to figure out how to email me, which he could have done through Thom's administrators and the access he would have had to my personal information. Poly somehow figured it out, so I know DRC could have got it.  I refused to provide any public information on Thom's board.  That seemed somehow incomprehensible to DRC.

    My guess is he had some kind of catastrophic health issue befall him.  A stroke, perhaps, or worse.  He was as addicted to writing there as I was.  So I doubt he chose just to suddenly quit without saying anything.  That'd be more my style.

    You went east, I went west.  All my family except my two brothers are in the upper Midwest, mostly Michigan.  My reasons are different.  The family is overall pretty tight and does its best to protect itself.  I'm just not much on religion and all the language that goes with it.  And they do not understand the language of ecology, though many love nature and some are still farming; some are doing arts and crafts.  Most have fit themselves into the institutional hierarchy somewhere. They are of this civilized culture without much questioning of its effects on the planet.  They do not see the military as I do; some are lifers, most others are respectful of that and its role in this nation. 

    I'm in touch seasonally, Christmas, with one aunt who took care of me for awhile when my mother had her schizophrenic break. I was five, she in her early twenties, two kids, married to a military lifer.  I can only imagine the trouble she was in at the time, yet she took me in.  I remember her running, catching up to me while I was on my little bicycle, headed for Detroit where I thought my mother was.  Detroit was a good twenty five miles away.  She tried to explain to me the impossibility of my goal, as I recall.  She handled it well, I think, considering my father was no where around, he was driving a semi. She's artistic and is still doing her art in an artsy crafty kind of way in her mid eighties.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Fri May 26, 2017 6:19 am

    inre post #53
    (And an apology to Leonard Cohen)

    Everyone knows, yes everyone knows
    the oceans are boiling, everyone knows 
    it's waters are dying and everyone knows 
    the polar bear is drowning, everyone knows the ice is melting
    and yes, everyone knows the seas are rising. 
    everybody knows, yes..........everybody does know

    Everyone knows the streams are poison
    everyone knows the ground grows noxious, everyone knows
    the air is becoming toxic and yes
    everyone knows there's too many mouths to feed, and everyone knows
    tomorrow there'll be even less to go around
    everyone knows they need more.
    everybody knows, yes every body does know.........

    the countdown has begun 
    everyone knows to listen
    toward the last whale song and final lone tiger roar
    everyone knows the days are numbered
    and everybody knows
    the butterfly is gone, everyone knows 
    the bee hive is deserted. And everyone knows, 
    to listen 
    for the closing aria
    of the soul surviving songbird trill.................. 

    Everybody knows. 
    Everyone knows

    Again my apologies to Mr. Cohen for butchering his song
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Sat May 27, 2017 7:49 am

    It took me a couple of readings to hear it with the Cohen rhythm, that's of course due to my music/language deficiencies, not yours in the poetry department.  But yeah, Everybody knows, and we have known for quite some time.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Sat May 27, 2017 3:08 pm

    I think I just wanted to be sure to give credit to Leonard Cohen for his concept. Try as I might I couldn't in a million years garner his meter or elegance without straight ahead plagiarizing him. So read the piece at what ever measure seems to fit as written. Or rearrange it however ...........  or add verses of your own to it if anyone feels so inclined. It's just something that popped into my head a couple of days ago. 
    No wordsmith am I.


    Still working on oneness and how it fits within the present time frame, let's call my last post a preamble to those thoughts I'm still trying to put in an coherent order.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Mon May 29, 2017 1:05 pm

    Man, this brain of mine is like one of those early home computers trying to load a refigured fractal equation. If you ever played with them in those days you'll know exactly what I mean, I can remember literally waiting for days on some equations.
    This particular vexing, and for me at least, complex problem involving 'oneness' has rather become like one of those programs, the picture is only rote and repetitive if one doesn't look too closely, deeply or let it run too long.
      
    I don't mean to be or want to be argumentative for while I also ascribe to the idea of a oneness it seems to me the human species has pretty much decided to act as one already and within this the US and European cultures pointedly so while ignoring all the warning signs along the way in deference to maintaining the american way of life no matter what side of the political aisle or almost any singular individual spiritual path of any one human residing within the institutional structure. 
    Consider the human:

    "[url=Curiously, overcrowding the planet has turned the planet small, as electronics and air travel shrink the world: %E2%80%9CIn the span of one human lifetime, 1945 to 2015, global population tripled from about 2.3 billion to 7.2 billion. This bizarre interlude, with sustained population growth of more than 1 percent per annum, is of course what almost everyone on Earth now regards as normal. It is anything but normal,%E2%80%9D Ibid, pg.]Curiously, overcrowding the planet has turned the planet small, as electronics and air travel shrink the world: “In the span of one human lifetime, 1945 to 2015, global population tripled from about 2.3 billion to 7.2 billion. This bizarre interlude, with sustained population growth of more than 1 percent per annum, is of course what almost everyone on Earth now regards as normal. It is anything but normal,” Ibid, pg.[/url]" quote from Counter Punch blog

    And of course everyone just continues as if the growth is somehow sustainable while pretending they are anything but like lemmings who cull their ranks by a head long rush to some cliff of doom. I suggest that if the human species continues eating up the Earth as well as all the other life that call it home as seems its' wont they'd better learn to do more than playing around with 3-d printers making car parts and etc, they'd better learn how to make the etc and food out of thin air.
    My path has given me little affinity towards the human per se and the idea that the human can save or does even want to save anything other than a thin dime in the bank down a tar paved street at 60 mph would be laughable only I don't really want to insult someone else's sensibilities. I could care less what happens to the human, my soul rests with the trees, the birds, wolves, tigers and elephants. I feel more at one with the dragon fly that stopped to say hi to me day before yesterday then any random human I'm more likely to meet and interact with day to day.

    My view is that within the culture and politics of this country the zeitgeist of oneness conquers all has found its' own true limitations. No culture can survive accepting all ideas and ideals as an equal value to its' ethos whatever that may be. The concept that I'm ok and you're ok except for this thing or the other but you're ok because we are all one has lead to our present day stalemate and perhaps closing in on a civil war. Not all ideas and ideals are equal and have always deserved be shunned, shutout and shot down with no small measure if necessary. There simply has to be bounds a culture or an individual is willing to accept and give leeway to if the values are to be maintained because if contrary ideals are allowed to germinate they will grow infesting and infecting the whole. Ergo the institution.  
    As our particular cultural institution is at least partly based in the Indian form of social governance the ethos has become much too accommodating to those that actually wish us ill. Witness what 'the oneness all inclusive' philosophy has wrought on the public stage of late and tell me love and oneness conquers all. If not now, when?

    No love lost between me and humans.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Mon May 29, 2017 2:28 pm

    I hope you didn't see what I was trying to say as counter to what you just said. I felt we were saying pretty much the same thing. I did the best I could not to drip the sarcasm I was feeling all over the screen.  I mean, you ask a "great mind" what to do about the current conundrum and the best it can come up with is engendering a oneness consciousness?  It's like saying nothing at all, or simply saying, there's no solution at this level of population and institutional arrangement; go away, don't bother me, which I think would at least be honest rather than to make ups some esoteric spiritual nonsense as an answer.

    I may have more to say later, right now its time to vegetate.  Just got back from our annual Tour de Toke.  Nothing to do with MJ, just a bunch of us still active geriatric baby boomers riding our bicycles from South Bend/Raymond to the Tokeland Hotel, staying the night, then riding back today.  I'm not tired, I'm actually energized, because I bicycle all the time, just I'm in a very nice head space and don't want to think about watching apocalypse for awhile. But I checked my email when I got home and here was a notification that you'd posted something, so curiosity got the better of me.

    I stayed in one of their rooms once, just for the experiential history of it.  But I've managed to talk them into letting me camp out in their spacious back yard that opens up to the Willapa Bay. I pay ten bucks to use the facilities and then get to have dinner and breakfast with the gang.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Fri Jun 02, 2017 10:46 am

    Now, here's something I find to be a kind of art therapy.  Rebecca Gordon writes a piece at Tomdispatch where she associates Orwell's novel, 1984, with our current circumstances. I don't know if it's healthy, but for me it is a kind of therapy to read her essay.

    Down the Memory Hole Living in Trump’s United States of Amnesia 

    The Internet as a government resource for accurate information from our bureaucracies is now better than anything Winston Smith was shown to be doing at the beginning of the novel.  I'm also getting images of the novel Farenheight 451 where individuals were tasking themselves with memorizing literature as the books were being burned.  I guess that would be the beginning of a new oral tradition, which, all in all, may not be a bad thing.

    Rebecca Gordon wrote:

    Since January, the Trump administration has been systematically removing from federal websites inconvenient information on subjects as diverse as climate change and occupational health and safety, and replacing it with anodyne messages. Take, for instance, this one, which you get when you search the Environmental Protection Agency’s website for the term “climate change” and click on links that search turns up:

    “This page is being updated.

    “Thank you for your interest in this topic. We are currently updating our website to reflect EPA's priorities under the leadership of President Trump and Administrator [Scott] Pruitt. If you're looking for an archived version of this page, you can find it on the January 19 snapshot.”

    If you do click on the link for that January 19, 2017, “snapshot,” you can still (for now) see what the old climate change portal of the Obama era looked like. At the top of the “snapshot,” however, is a bright red notice announcing:

    “This is not the current EPA website. To navigate to the current EPA website, please go to www.epa.gov. This website is historical material reflecting the EPA website as it existed on January 19, 2017. This website is no longer updated and links to external websites and some internal pages may not work.”

    The government has now entered full-scale climate change denial mode. Information of just about any sort on global warming has been or is being memory-holed in a wholesale fashion at other agency websites as well. The Guardian, for instance, reports that, in the part of the Department of Energy’s site addressed to children, “sentences that point out the harmful health consequences of burning coal and other impacts of fossil fuels have gone.” At the State Department, references to President Obama’s Climate Action Plan and a recent U.N. meeting on climate change have similarly been expunged.


    And yesterday Trump single-handedly removed us as a nation from the international Paris Climate Accord.

    Watching Apocalypse.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:18 am

    My last post was really just some my thoughts on the theory of oneness solving what ails humanity. You voiced pretty much of my same thoughts only much clearer and in a gentler way than I did. I didn't really try to be sarcastic in fact I tried to tone it down bit because I realize even if Kay doesn't post I believe she does monitor what is written here and she is a gentle soul moving through this harsh wish mash of a world. We just have a different view on how that oneness can be arrived at beyond an individual self is all. After all if humanity can't act as one about what is a very real and immediate existential threat, how is it any of the other out laying cultural problems going to be resolved by something as vaporous as 'oneness'? 
    Most anybody places much more importance on any single human being in relation to everything else than I do, can't say I have such a high regard for what passes as human because they walk upright on two legs and has a flattish face that resembles mine because of, well just because, but Kay does so I did really did try to tone my rhetoric down. 
    Sorry if I crossed the line, I'll try to watch my tenor more carefully.

    There's other stuff I'd like to get to on the cultural front but I do have to be moving on this morning......so it'll have to be later on.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:28 am

    They say that once something gets put into one these 'simple' little devises we all possess and off into the cloud it goes that it never disappears. One can only hope that's true.
    The bad thing about that is disinformation also gets it's way in the now seemingly endless war between what is fact and what is fiction even though one would think separating the two shouldn't be that hard it seems to be so for a good portion of the populous. How does that happen? 
     One of the more popular themes these days is that those groups of fact disbelieving people are sick of being talked down to and then double down in their intransigence. Well, how does one NOT talk down to them? They deny facts!  Why not just give them needles filled with oil and coal tar derivatives to mainline for the trip on the great asphalt highway to forever in their Cadillac Escalade? 

    There really is some kind of therapy in watching people live up to your lowest expectations. 
    But as you say, I'm not sure its good for any of us to go there even as I think in our own ways, we all do.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:04 am

    It's digitally stored information. If that storage unit is destroyed, so is the information it contains. I've read there's some big huge building somewhere designed to store all the data. It also takes some sort of software, of course working within hardware, to translate the digital information into something that enables us to make sense of it.  I'm inclined to wonder why.  Who even conceived of the idea to do that and for what purpose?

    I think the key notion is that we, actual living human beings, have to make sense of information for the real world we live in.  We are existentially creative in that regard.  My concern with the facebook format is that it does not heighten the capacity to use language as a form of conversation because of that conveyor belt of time design that is built into it.  It can be used to communicate about any particular topic that someone brings up, but the spread of topics across millions of different individual timelines, converging in a huge variety of news feeds that bring up selections of each individuals "friends" --and I have over a hundred -- provides an endless source of distraction.  One of my local friends discovered facebook awhile ago, connected with some of her friends from different time periods going back as far as high school, and she didn't get to sleep for several days.  It was an orgy of connections for her.  The only way I could actually get her to hold still for a real conversation was by sitting down with her in our local cafe over some coffee.

    I just wonder what the hell all those connections amount to.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Tue Jun 06, 2017 8:17 am

    ogun wrote:The bad thing about that is disinformation also gets it's way in the now seemingly endless war between what is fact and what is fiction even though one would think separating the two shouldn't be that hard it seems to be so for a good portion of the populous. How does that happen? 

     One of the more popular themes these days is that those groups of fact disbelieving people are sick of being talked down to and then double down in their intransigence. Well, how does one NOT talk down to them? They deny facts!  Why not just give them needles filled with oil and coal tar derivatives to mainline for the trip on the great asphalt highway to forever in their Cadillac Escalade? 

    There really is some kind of therapy in watching people live up to your lowest expectations. 
    But as you say, I'm not sure its good for any of us to go there even as I think in our own ways, we all do.

    Another thought on this, this one is related to something a friend of mine shared with me.  This:

    The cult of ignorance in the United States: Anti-intellectualism and the "dumbing down" of America  by Ray Williams, psychologytoday.com



    There is a growing and disturbing trend of anti-intellectual elitism in American culture. It's the dismissal of science, the arts, and humanities and their replacement by entertainment, self-righteousness, ignorance, and deliberate gullibility.

    Susan Jacoby, author of The Age of American Unreason, says in an article in the Washington Post, "Dumbness, to paraphrase the late senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, has been steadily defined downward for several decades, by a combination of heretofore irresistible forces. These include the triumph of video culture over print culture; a disjunction between Americans' rising level of formal education and their shaky grasp of basic geography, science and history; and the fusion of anti-rationalism with anti-intellectualism."

    There has been a long tradition of anti-intellectualism in America, unlike most other Western countries. Richard Hofstadter, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1964 for his book, Anti-Intellectualism In American Life, describes how the vast underlying foundations of anti-elite, anti-reason and anti-science have been infused into America's political and social fabric. Famous science fiction writer Isaac Asimov once said:



    "There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."


    Mark Bauerlein, in his book, The Dumbest Generation, reveals how a whole generation of youth is being dumbed down by their aversion to reading anything of substance and their addiction to digital "crap" via social media.


    And it goes on, you can read more if you want.  I was just struck with his use of the phrase: "deliberate gullibility" at the end of that first short paragraph.  Deliberate?  Really? Is that even possible?
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:57 am

    I tracked these lines down to the artist who wrote and performed them:

    “I’ve been down so long, Lawd, down don’t worry me.”

    and

    "I feel my hell a-risin’, a-risin’ every day;
    I feel my hell a-risin’, a-risin’ every day;
    Someday it’ll burst this levee and wash the whole wide world away."

    Ishman (sometimes Ishmon) Bracy was born about the same time as my maternal Grandfather, Joseph Pisacic, who fled the genocidal guns of the Serbians at the close of WWI as they marauded through Croatian villages in an endeavor to wipe out the male Croatian seed.  He and his brother wound up here in America by somehow getting on some boat in an Italian port.  I don't know the full story and the would be story teller died just after I got back from 'Nam, 'bout the same time as Ishman. My interest in such history really did not peak (not a mispelling of pique) until after he was gone. He was, I do at least know due to a long standing philosophical antipathy between he and my father, an anti war socialist.  Didn't have much direct influence on me, but I'm pretty sure his influence came down through my mother.  I remember him saying after I avoided the draft, in an effort to avoid the army where I'd be sure to be trained in the art of killing, by joining the Navy, that he wouldn't be seeing me again.  I told him I'd joined the Navy because I thought that gave me a better chance to get back.  It didn't dawn on me at the time he might have meant it was he who might be dying in the interim, not me.  But that might have been what he meant.  Turns out it was neither of us who'd be dying, but he was gone within a few months after I got out, and I was somewhere in the wilds of Mt Wrightson National Forest with my dog, recovering from what I realize was a form of PTSD when he died.  I managed to get home for the funeral. He never really did get that comfortable with the English language and, sadly, they, my grandparents, did not believe I should learn Croatian.  Thus we never really could have long, in depth, discussions.

    I don't know what song or possibly songs those lines came from but I like this one:

    'Left Alone Blues' ISHMAN BRACEY (1928) Delta Blues Guitar Legend



    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Sat Jun 10, 2017 6:31 am

    Conversation? What's that about, no one seems to know these days.
    I don't know squat about Facebook, snap-chat or whatever the hell people are using today to supposedly communicate, I don't own a cell phone or a so called smart device, never have and probably never will. What I know about them is they make any conversation of meaning with anyone damn near an impossibility. Even if they don't answer the every 5 minute ring tone they seem compelled to take it out and look at it looking to see who it is looking. I find it more than a distracting, annoying and down right rude gesture, to me it immediately shows the person I'm attempting to have a meaningful dialog with doesn't have any thoughts of connecting with real life and is running away from reality and disappearing themselves into a 2 and a half inch screen endless life cycle. Much the same as a confined hamster running a wheel day after day. 

    Yeah deliberate, that's a good question. Is it a deliberate gullibility on anyones part? Or is it that most of humanity really are born to be gullible? And they always will be. It only has to be nurtured and fed for the gullibility factor to be of any use. Is that all it is? I wonder, could I have been anything other than me?
    I don't know, it seems to me what ever was poured into this oddly shaped vessel would have always taken on the form I started as at the beginning. Would things have been different for better or worse, very likely but that's beside the point, would I be any less cynical? Any less questioning? More gullible? Be so called more in tune? 
    I seriously question the premise that I was just a blob of clay that could have been formed into whatever after birth. So I wonder if most of humanity really are born to be just gullible and that's just what they are. 
    Hmmm, sounds kind of elitist doesn't it. Let me think about that for a while.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Mon Jun 12, 2017 9:59 am

    I think these social media are more about ways of keeping in touch than communicating in the way I personally think of as conversation.

    Almost everyone I know who is in my age bracket now has a cell phone that's also a smart device, somewhat along the lines of a computer but more to me a marketing device through what they call apps, that you don't have much ability to work with in the way I do various programs on my computer.  If you want an app that doesn't advertise something as well, you have to pay extra.  You can't do much without an app, so most people tolerate the advertising. I read somewhere recently where a writer drily commented that spring has finally arrived though he doubted many had looked up from their phones to notice. That's even true around here, where you'd think people know each other well enough to say hi as they walk by rather than be glued to something going on through their phone elsewhere.

    I've stuck with computers.  I don't need a cell phone and they aren't cheap. 

    I tend to think gullibility is a default state.  People don't have to intend it. It just is the way they are, until doubt and skepticism arises somehow, hard to say how, I've spent my life trying to understand that.  They have to intend otherwise.  Which I don't think is the norm.  So deliberate, i.e., intentional gullibility is an incongruous thought construct to me.  It could be poetic if the writer actually thought about what he was saying.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Wed Jun 14, 2017 5:48 am

    Spring, summer, fall, winter it's all the same if one is living on/within a 2 inch HD screen though you'd think the realization would sink in for those misbegotten souls that life could get real different for not noting they're walking across traffic at busy intersection or as they admire their Facebook hits while wheeling a 2 ton vehicle down the road at 50 or 60 mph. Spring, what's the need to notice? See this tweet that just came in............
    More than once I've found myself losing patience and telling some friend to just turn the damn thing off or move along. I've a couple of patrons that come through now and again that courteously turn them off before coming in, most people though aren't that polite.

    Still, one has to admire the forever nature of the human for invention. Who'd thunk that darn near every person on the planet could have at their finger tips in mere seconds more knowledge than even the designers of Library of Alexandria ever dreamt of by the use of stringing together a bunch of 0's and 1's? Or that anyone could share some found knowledge with anyone else on the planet in less time than it takes to comb your hair in the morning?
    And yet people demonstratively are getting shallower and dumber, very puzzling that. 
    Hmmm, could it be that it's more a function of just a percent in numbers? Let's suppose for a moment that in percentage of the human population that's gullible (if we can use that term) the number has remained relatively consistent throughout human history. But now with 7 point something billion people presently living it only seems like they're taking over because there's so many of them.

    Again my time is getting short,
    Later
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Wed Jun 14, 2017 7:08 am

    I have a feeling time's getting short for everyone.  Hope I've fed that feeling with false information.

    Anyway, thoughts similar to yours are what brought me to this notion that I'm watching apocalypse unfold on many fronts.

    Take away these very short term inventions that have consumed the minds of the gullible and naive of the species... would the situation be any different?  I think not.

    Noam Chomsky, credited as one of the greatest intellects alive today, notes we modern day civilized humans have created a perfect storm since the end of WWII.  He spent most of his life -- outside his truly brilliant work in linguistics -- railing against the political side and trying to expose the truth of the infernal deceptiveness that continues to befuddle the gullible minds.  Good work, for the most part.  I truly appreciated his theory about how mass media is controlled in Manufacturing Consent.  But others have provided me with great food for thought.  What's interesting is that in all those years he never brought up the environmental side of what he is now calling a perfect storm.  He seems to have only discovered that in his later years with the publicity that's arisen around global warming.  I think, now in his late eighties, he's up to speed on that, finally.  As an aside, my own first awareness was triggered when Rachael Carson wrote and published Silent Spring.  To me, that was far more important than the politics, that is, until I had to figure out what to do about this political system sucking me into their war in Vietnam.  Then I realized I couldn't ignore people, as dumb as I thought they were.  Their stupidity was bound to affect me no matter how carefully I went about avoiding them and their stupid system.

    While the brilliant Chomsky sees that we have created both parts of the perfect storm that can wipe out humanity (and many other species) since WWII, I see that one part of it has been developing for over 10,000 years with the rise of civilized societies and the integrally related organizational structures, these hierarchical institutions.  It's these institutions that take such complete advantage of the gullible minds among us.  For nobody really questions how they are structured or even whether they should be.  Most people assume it has always been this way.  The knowledge that it hasn't is seldom shared.  You have to go looking for it.  And few do.  Even when it's called to their attention they turn away.

    To the gullible among us, most readily apparent part of the perfect storm Chomsky's referring to is the threat of a nuclear holocaust, now that humans have innovated the thorough mass destruction capabilities of the nuclear weapons that were innovated into existence by the end of WWII.  The evil threat when you and I were young was presented to Americans as being in the hands of the commies.  As today, few here in the States saw the United States government as a threat.  It is, after all, exceptional.  It is and always will be the great leader of the "free" world, despite it's guilt as being the only political entity ever, then or since, to use two of those early versions on two Japanese cities filled with civilians just going about their daily lives as their government took part in a global war as a global threat to humanity.  It was the evil commie Russkies who posed a threat, not us. We're the good guys in this holocaust scenario, we just defend ourselves.  And the man who made that decision to drop those bombs was every bit a sub par intellect as is Donald Trump today.  There's no escaping human stupidity as I see it.

    The other part of the perfect storm is the human caused sixth mass extinction, which I already knew about being in the works when I read Catton's Overshoot, published about 1980, when there were approximately 4.4 billion humans on this planet.  Ten years before that, when I got out of the military, and went on to become a full fledged environmentalist, there were only 3.7 billion.  Though Catton brilliantly summarized what I already knew, I do, however, thank him for introducing me to a metaphor I've thought with ever since: the term "homo colossus".  That metaphor described for me all of civilized humans together as a kind of variant species, a cultural GMO that was killing off all the other cultures on the planet.  That particular insight I had an opportunity to learn thanks to my studies in anthropology.  Civilization is the great killer of human culture and those variation's innate potential to adapt to environments with minimal impact.

    When Catton published his book he had in mind its insight might provide the basis for revolutionary change, that's what he audaciously used as the subtitle: Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change.  I'm relatively sure he had hope that the revolutionary change would come about intentionally on the part of humans who would wake up to what they were doing as a species.  Of course the obvious revolutionary change would be the effect of the perfect storm Chomsky is now talking about as he nears the end of his life.

    Here's an interview with Catton in 2008, not long before he died:



    I'm trying to imagine a conversation of this sort between Donald Trump and William Catton.  Topic to be discussed: Make America Great Again.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:51 am



    Hello hello! Seems I've at least gotten a start at getting back up and running.
    Looking at the dates, wow almost a month ago, I originally put this aside for a couple of days to collect some thoughts and then when next I sat down my computer had been fried. WTF! I thought maybe it had gotten wet, um no. I opened or rather pealed off the back cover to discover what looked like spider web streaks (burnt) trails throughout the mother board and sooty scorched arced areas on various plugged in peripherals. Great! Just great.
    So now almost a month later I got a new computer and trying to get it set up back to something that's familiar enough that this idiot can use it.
    Stupid machines. 
    Looks like I might be making some head way though. I'm back on line!
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:22 am

    It's an enigma.



    Notice in my inbox.  Clicked the link.  I got a flash of your video before I logged in, then when i logged in your video turned into url gibberrish.  Sorry, I edited to make it work.  Stupid machines indeed.  I warn: Never mistake them for human.  They are tools. (And never mistake humans for tools, but they do and will)  I refuse to anthropomorphize them.  I have friends that give their tools human names.  I can't do that.

    Good to hear you have a new one that may help you interface a little better.  Is it a laptop?

    More of the enigma of time



    Would there be an enigma without why?

    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:37 am


    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:09 am

    Ja, I got a little more up to date Mac Book Pro lap top. LOL, not that'll help me in any great major in the interfacing realm of things. Damn I thought I'd gotten that vid embedded properly. If I don't figure it out or don't get things configured right on this end be sure and let me know so's I can make things easier for you and whoever else. I'd like to get things right.
    Yeah, I too give pet names to my machines. I call them sweet nothings like, stupid machine, bucket of bolts and hunks of junk to name some my top favorites without going into the more profane niceties.

    Time.........what an artificial construct.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:22 am

    I don't know what you did wrong. Did you copy the url and paste it into that youtube box that pops up?  It looked like you copied and pasted the embed code, which worked oddly enough for a second, long enough for me to see what it was, then it disappeared into gibberish.

    Hard to realize what a disastrously artificial construct time is until one can remove oneself from daily routines demanded by civilized life.  Then they look at me suspiciously and tell me I might be insane because I don't know what day it is.  I find it all very amusing.

    ogun
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Posts : 88
    Join date : 2016-10-14

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by ogun on Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:40 am

    Hmmm, so I must have pushed the wrong box? Because I did use the embedded key. 
    Ugh, not that this brain was anything to brag about to begin with but it seems to not getting any better with age either. URL, URL, URL! I'll try to remember that the next time.

    Well time. 
    It's kind of amazing (in a way) that a species that so fixated on time can be so blind to it's own end of time if it doesn't change its ways of living.
    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:35 am

    That's right.  Don't use the embed key, just use the url for the page the video is playing in. 

    This is what the url looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2xODjbfYw8

    And, this is what the embed code looks like: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/n2xODjbfYw8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    I saw the embed code when I edited your post.  I changed it to the url.

    I hate rules, but if I don't create them for myself I'll be even more isolated when it comes to communicating.  And I am very isolated as it is.

    And here's an artistic image, fitting for this thread if humor can be a form of therapy, it can for me, that I feel speaks to your point about the species:

    avatar
    Ren's View
    Admin

    Posts : 248
    Join date : 2016-09-16

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Ren's View on Thu Jul 13, 2017 10:14 am

    The Sound of Silence




    Silence Must Be Heard




    The Silent Warrior


    Sponsored content

    Re: Art As Therapy

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:51 am